Services:

Civil Engineering, Site and Wetlands Permitting, Construction Documents and Construction Observation

Client:

Raytheon Company

Services:

Civil Engineering, Site and Wetlands Permitting, Construction Documents and Construction Observation

Client:

Raytheon Company

Services:

Civil Engineering, Site and Wetlands Permitting, Construction Documents and Construction Observation

Client:

Raytheon Company

Services:

Civil Engineering, Site and Wetlands Permitting, Construction Documents and Construction Observation

Client:

Raytheon Company

Services
Feasibility Studies
Master Planning / Strategic Planning for Site Development
Environmental & Wetland Assessment & Replication
Site Permits & Environmental Approvals
Landscape Architecture, Site Planning & Design
Civil Engineering
Construction Documents & Administration
Sustainable Site and Environmentally Sensitive Site Design
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Raytheon Company / Hager Pond

The 570,000 square foot commercial development potential of this site could not have been realized without impacting the existing wetland constraints of the site.  The land is located over an aquifer recharge area protected by watershed zoning and 30 of the 118 acres were identified as wetlands; these wetlands completely bisected the site.

Low impact development components of the site design included the construction of bioretention cells, wet ponds, replicated wetlands and by implementing innovative systems for biological attenuation of pollutants and recharging the ground water system.  The design challenge was to ballance existing recharge rates, maintain existing water quality and to replicate any wetlands lost to crossing the wetlands with an access road.

All storm runoff from pavements and lawn areas were subjected to biological treatment by routing storm water through pretreatment marshes and silt sumps prior to release to the existing wetlands.  Clean roof water was piped seperate from the storm runoff system to leaching galley's located under paved areas for direct recharge to the ground water.

The replication of lost wetlands and the introdution of new biological systems actually increased the area of sustainable wetlands and wildlife habitat on this site.

This site was among the first in the State to receive LEED Certification.